12162017Headline:

Bentonville, Arkansas

HomeArkansasBentonville

Email Sach D. Oliver Sach D. Oliver on LinkedIn Sach D. Oliver on Twitter Sach D. Oliver on Facebook
Sach D. Oliver
Sach D. Oliver
Contributor •

Effective Leadership Requires “eq” Not Iq

Comments Off

EFFECTIVE LEADERSHIP REQUIRES “EQ” NOT IQ

Most everyone knows what an IQ is, but many do not have any idea what an “EQ” is, even though it is nearly impossible to be an effective leader without it. EQ first caught my attention is a great book, Emotional Intelligence: Why it can matter more than IQ, by Daniel Goleman. Then I read an article by Jamie S. at Northwest Arkansas News and I thought about this blog.

“EQ” is emotional intelligence, or having the ability to manage one’s emotions and to understand and respond to the emotional needs of others. William Chew, CFO of Bama Food, Inc. and an expert on emotional intelligence spoke about this issue recently at a local college.

Chew told the crowd that a common reason for leaders to fail is their lack of emotional strength. Chew stated that “IQ gets you to the party, but it doesn’t keep you there,” he said. “IQ gets you to the interview, but EQ gets you the job.”

Chew outlined the five components essential to having “EQ”:

  • Self-awareness: Understanding your own moods and emotions, as well as their effect on others;
  • Self-regulation: Being able to control and redirect your own disruptive impulses and moods, as well as being able to think before acting;
  • Motivation: The propensity to pursue goals with energy and persistence and having a passion for work that goes beyond gaining money and status;
  • Empathy: The ability to understand the emotional makeup of others, as well as having the skills to treat people according to their emotional reactions; and
  • Social Skills: A proficiency in managing relationships and building networks, as well as the ability to find common ground with people and build support.

Chew also said that having a strong emotional intelligence is not only important in business, but in one’s personal life.

This post written by: Leona Crowe, Legal Assistant to Sach Oliver